Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis has to be tailor-made for every child, based on his health status, past history of illness and duration of illness. Welling Clinic offers specially formulated homeopathy treatment for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Being an auto-immune illness, Homeopathy can be one of the most effective mode of treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

What is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis?

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About 1 child in every 1,000 develops some type of chronic arthritis. These disorders can affect children at any age, although rarely in the first six months of life. Growing up with arthritis can be challenging.  There are various types of chronic childhood arthritis, which can last from several months to many years. In every instance, early diagnosis and Homeopathy treatment can help avoid joint damage.

Several types of arthritis, all involving chronic (long-term) joint inflammation, fall under the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis heading. This inflammation begins before patients reach the age of 16, and symptoms must last more than 6 weeks to be called chronic. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis may involve one or many joints, and may also affect the eyes. It can cause other symptoms such as fevers or rash.

Systemic onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis affects about ten percent of children with arthritis. It begins with repeating fevers that can be 103°F or higher, often accompanied by a salmon-colored rash that comes and goes. Systemic onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis may cause inflammation of the internal organs as well as the joints, though joint swelling may not appear until months or even years after the fevers began. Anemia (a low red blood cell count) and elevated white blood cell counts are also typical findings in blood tests ordered to evaluate the fevers and ongoing symptoms. Arthritis may persist even after the fevers and other symptoms have disappeared.

Oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, which involves fewer than five joints in its first stages, affects about half of all children with arthritis. Girls are more at risk than boys. Some older children with oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis may develop “extended” arthritis that involves many joints and lasts into adulthood. Children who develop the oligoarticular form of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis when they are younger than seven years old have the best chance of having their joint disease subside with time. They are, however, at increased risk of developing an inflammatory eye problem (iritis or uveitis). Eye inflammation may persist independently of the arthritis. Because this eye inflammation usually does not cause symptoms, regular exams by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) are essential to detect these conditions and identify treatment to prevent vision loss.

Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis affects five or more joints and can begin at any age. Children diagnosed with polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in their teens may actually have the adult form of rheumatoid arthritis at an earlier-than-usual age.

With psoriatic arthritis, children have both arthritis and a skin disease called psoriasis or a family history of psoriasis in a parent or sibling. Typical signs of psoriatic arthritis include nail changes and widespread swelling of a toe or finger called dactylitis.

Enthesitis-Related Arthritis is a form of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis that often involves attachments of ligaments as well as the spine. This form is sometimes called a spondyloarthritis. These children may have joint pain without obvious swelling and may complain of back pain and stiffness. There is sometimes a family history of arthritis of the spine.

Causes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Malfunctioning of the immune system in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis targets the lining of the joint, known as the synovial membrane. This causes inflammation. When the inflammation is untreated, joint damage may occur.

It is not known what causes the immune system to malfunction in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. In rare cases (such as in psoriatic arthritis or enthesitis-related arthritis) a parent has the same form of arthritis. Dietary and emotional factors do not appear to play a role in the development of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

Because the causes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis are unknown, no one knows how to prevent these conditions.

Symptoms of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

hese are some of the most common early signs and symptoms of arthritis in children. A child may not have all of these symptoms.

  • Joints that are warm to the touch
  • Swelling and tenderness at joints
  • Fever
  • Rash
  • Favoring one limb over another or limping
  • Pain (often worse following sleep or inactivity)
  • Stiffness, especially upon waking in the morning
  • Inability to bend or straighten joints completely
  • Decreased physical activity
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep problems
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Reduced appetite and/or weight loss

Not all children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis will have the same symptoms, and some symptoms are specific to a subtype of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Symptoms can change from day to day or throughout a single day.

Diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis may be difficult to diagnose because some children may not complain of pain at first and joint swelling may not be obvious. There is no blood test that can be used to diagnose the condition. Adults with rheumatoid arthritis typically have a positive rheumatoid factor blood test, but children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis typically have a negative rheumatoid factor blood test. As a result, diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis depends on physical findings, medical history, and the exclusion of other diagnoses.

Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

The overall treatment goal is to control symptoms, prevent joint damage, and maintain function. When only a few joints are involved, a steroid can be injected into the joint before any additional medications are given. Steroids injected into the joint do not have significant side effects. Oral steroids such as prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone, Prelone, Orapred) may be used in certain situations, but only for as short a time and at the lowest dose possible. The long-term use of steroids is associated with side effects such as weight gain, poor growth, osteoporosis, cataracts, avascular necrosis, hypertension, and risk of infection.

Homeopathy Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

After consulting for the last 18 years we believe Homeopathy has been very effective in dealing with auto-immune diseases like Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. The tailor-made treatment by an experienced Homeopathy from Welling Homeopathy can help in relieving the pain, swelling and tenderness. Long term treatment with Welling Homeopathy treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis can help stop the progress of illness and prevent joint erosion and damage.

Visit one of the clinics to meet our specialists for a detailed assessment and to know how homeopathy can help in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in your child.

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